Committee Chair

Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Committee Member

Weathington, Bart L.; O'Leary, Brian J.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Organizational wellness programs can serve as a powerful tool for organizations to improve the health and well-being of employees. As organizational wellness grows in popularity and implementation, organizations should seek to understand employee perceptions of these programs to maximize their effectiveness and use. The present study examined the effect of perceived organizational support of wellness, core self-evaluation, and motivation/interest for wellness programs on wellness program use and satisfaction. This effect was tested with barriers to use and participative wellness design as possible mediators. Motivation and interest had a strong and direct effect on program use and satisfaction, while both organizational support and core self-evaluation were mediated by resource-related barriers. Organizations can use these findings to develop strategies to improve program effectiveness through increasing employee motivation, showing support for wellness, and limiting the impact of barriers to program effectiveness

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2013

Subject

Employee health promotion

Discipline

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

x, 87 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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