Committee Chair

Warren, Amye R.

Committee Member

Ross, David F.; Weathington, Bart L.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Juvenile suspects are far more prone than adults to make false confessions. Two interrogation techniques known as Minimization (gentle, friendly approach used to gain suspect’s trust) and Maximization (coercive approach using harsh questioning and scare tactics) have been used frequently in cases of proven false confessions in juveniles. The present research examined perceptions of a juvenile suspect’s confession in four hundred sixty four participants recruited from psychology courses. They read a sexual assault vignette involving a 12- or 16- year-old male suspect and police interview excerpts utilizing either Minimization or Maximization interrogation techniques. Participants’ views depended on their gender, the age of the suspect, and the interrogation technique used. Contrary to hypotheses, the 12-year-old suspect was seen as more likely to confess when questioned with Minimization whereas the 16-year-old was viewed as more likely to confess when questioned with Maximization, Overall, participants did not believe juvenile suspects of either age understood their legal rights or the consequences involved in confessing.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2013

Subject

Child witnesses

Discipline

Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

x, 81 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS