Committee Chair

Yaqub, Raziq

Committee Member

Craven, Stephen D.; Sisworahardjo, Nurhidajat

Department

Dept. of Electrical Engineering

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The US government predicts more than 1 million electric vehicles (EVs), on U.S. roadways by 2015, and these numbers will increase exponentially in the future. However, the power grid cannot furnish the charging for numerous EVs at a given time mainly because of its energy production capabilities, peak usage, and distribution infrastructure. Some studies indicate that adopting “smart” charging, for example, scheduling EV charging, can alleviate the challenge. Nevertheless, such strategies are not useful for emergency and first responders’ vehicles. This thesis proposes a solution that provides priority treatment for government Authorized Emergency Electrical Vehicles (AEEV). The thesis proposes a complete architecture for providing priority charging service to the government authorized electric vehicles from any utility operator. To realize such a service, this proposal also suggests modifications required in the IEC15118 and IEC 61850 protocol suites. These protocols provide communication between Vehicle and Grid.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

8-2012

Subject

Computational grids (Computer systems); Electric vehicles; Emergency vehicles

Keyword

Authorized Emergency Electrical Vehicles (AEEV)

Discipline

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

xii, 58 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS