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Abstract

In May and June of 2004, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) summer archaeological field school carried out systematic testing at the Doak House Museum, an extant antebellum structure in Greeneville, Tennessee. This testing program was predicated on the previous summer’s research, which resulted in the discovery of significant archaeological remains in the project area (Honerkamp 2003, 2004). Located on the campus of Tusculum College, the house was built about 1830 by the Reverend Samuel W. Doak, the founder of the College. Doak was a minister, educator and successful planter and landowner who apparently did not possess slaves. His large brick two-story house has been continuously occupied by family descendents until its transformation into a museum in the 1970s. Current plans call for construction of an expanded parking lot and considerable upgrading of utilities, necessitating the archaeological survey and testing program.

Department

Dept. of Social, Cultural, and Justice Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Date

10-1-2004

Subject

Archaeology--Tennessee--Greene County; Antiquities; Archaeology; Greene County (Tenn.)--Antiquities

Location

Greeneville (Tenn.); Greene County (Tenn.)

Document Type

reports

Extent

ii, 28 leaves

Language

English

Call Number

F443.G75 H66 2004

Rights

Under copyright.

Archaeological testing at the Doak House and Academy, Greeneville, Tennessee

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