Project Director

Melnick, Laurie

Department Examiner

Ray, Steve

Department

Dept. of Theatre and Speech

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

In children’s drama and literature, Native Americans are rarely represented fully and accurately. Generalizations and stereotypes have lead to severe misunderstandings and an underappreciation for Native American cultures, even in areas rich with their history. This research study sought the efficacy of classroom drama strategies on classroom learning, particularly using storytelling to further children’s understanding of Native American culture. The results show that drama and storytelling can be effective ways to teach children about other cultures by keeping students engaged, promoting participation, and allowing students to make connections and explore learning on their own.

IRB Number

17-127

Degree

B. A.; An honors thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Bachelor of Arts.

Date

5-2018

Subject

Indians of North America -- Folklore

Keyword

Culture; Stereotype; Education; Drama strategy; Storytelling; Native American

Discipline

Theatre and Performance Studies

Document Type

Theses

Extent

28, 6 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS