Project Director

Gao, Cuilan

Department Examiner

Ledoan, Andrew; Saleh, Ossama

Department

Dept. of Mathematics

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Resident clinics (RCs) are intended to catalyze the achievement of educational milestones through progressively autonomous patient care. However, few studies quantify their effect on competency-based surgical education, and no previous publications focus on hand surgery RCs. This study aims to use statistical theories and knowledge of descriptive statistics and inference statistics, such as confidence intervals, two sample t-tests, correlation and association tests, as well as statistical model building such as analysis of variance with random effects and mixed linear models. We hypothesize that the higher a resident’s training years, the higher the autonomy score (quality of surgery) will be. We found that the mixed linear regression model with fixed factors: training level and surgery type and one random factor: residents, appears to be the best model to predict the autonomy score. Therefore, we conclude that the progressive autonomy score of a resident on a hand surgery depends on both the training levels of the resident and the type of surgery that the residents conducted. In addition, the performance may also vary from resident to resident given the same training level and surgery type.

Acknowledgments

I would first like to thank Dr. Gao, as she has provided me with endless support, encouragement, and patience. Completion of the thesis would not have been possible without her prompt and constructive feedback. I also want to thank Dr. Ledoan for suggesting that students pursue an undergraduate thesis and for his willingness to serve on my thesis committee. I am also thankful for the additional support from Dr. Saleh. Although I have never been his student, he generously agreed to serve on the thesis committee.

Degree

B. S.; An honors thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Bachelor of Science.

Date

12-2017

Subject

Hand -- Wounds and injuries; Hand -- Surgery; Medical education

Keyword

Linear models; Resident clinics; Statistics

Discipline

Mathematics

Document Type

Theses

Extent

29 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Included in

Mathematics Commons

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