Project Director

Clark, Amanda

Department Examiner

Shelton, Jill; Ferrier, David

Department

Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Executive function plays an important role in everyday life skills such as planning, organizing, controlling and sustaining attention, and socializing. Until recently, executive function was measured almost exclusively using laboratory-based assessments. However, many participants would score satisfactorily on those laboratory assessments, while having significant difficulty with activities of daily living. A potential solution to this issue is the Multiple Errands Test (MET), which is an ecologically valid assessment that can help predict performance of everyday life skills. The MET is a flexible assessment that can be modified in order to fit the needs of the setting and patient. Indeed, many versions have been examined such as the MET-Hospital Version, the Baycrest MET and Baycrest MET Revised, as well as a Virtual MET. This thesis describes how the MET is used in various ways: as a baseline assessment to determine the degree of executive dysfunction, as a tool to teach patients strategies to use to improve their performance, and as an indicator of executive function improvement following interventions. Future research could focus on improving some of the limitations of the MET, specifically how to best simplify scoring while still capturing inefficient behaviors.

Degree

B. S.; An honors thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Bachelor of Science.

Date

5-2018

Subject

Cognition disorders; Executive functions (Neuropsychology)

Keyword

Cognition; Acquired brain injury; Multiple Errands Test; Executive function

Discipline

Psychology

Document Type

Theses

Extent

35 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Included in

Psychology Commons

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