Project Director

Purkey, Lynn C.

Department Examiner

Murillo, Edwin

Department

Dept. of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

A language spoken by 3.7 million people in Peru and by several thousands more in the surrounding countries in the Andean region, Quechua as an indigenous language plays an important role not only in the rich history of the area but also the modern society. Through a history of colonization and racial injustice against indigenous groups, Quechua has survived as one of the strongest language groups in Latin America. Peru has been leading the way in bilingual education focused around acquisition, but does this focus on the key aspects of language acquisition for Quechua function in order to improve cultural identification? In this paper, I will build a framework for how to best understand learning Quechua in a Spanish dominated society and use this framework to offer a better solution than bilingual education to increase self-identification among indigenous Peruvians.

Degree

B. A.; An honors thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Bachelor of Arts.

Date

5-2019

Subject

Quechua language; Language acquisition; Education, Bilingual -- Peru; Quechua Indians -- Education

Keyword

Quechua; Majority-minority languages; Language acquisition; Cultural identification

Discipline

Latin American Languages and Societies

Document Type

Theses

Extent

37 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/

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