Project Director

Shelton, Jill T.

Department Examiner

Zelin, Alexandra

Department

Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Episodic future thinking is defined as the ability to mentally project oneself self into the future and pre-experience an event. Prospective memory, on the other hand, is often defined as remembering to complete future intentions. Prospective memory includes two kinds of prospective memory tasks: event-based, or prospective memory prompted by some form of external cue or event, and time-based, or a task that an individual must remember to complete at a specific time. One area that synthesizes these two subjects is the realm of goal achievement, specifically academic goal achievement. In this study, I explored how episodic future thinking, when used as an encoding strategy, might affect both time and event-based naturalistic prospective memory tasks. In this naturalistic study, students generated a series of six academic goal-motivated tasks to be completed in the following three days. All academic goals were submitted over a Google form where students also answered whether they used internal or external reminders to remember their goals. Half of the participants underwent an episodic future thinking protocol when encoding their academic goals, which did not significantly increase prospective memory performance. There was a positive correlation between external cue use and academic goal achievement, implying there may be a benefit for using external reminders for remembering goals. In addition, results showed that students submitted their event-based goals at a higher rate when compared to their time-based goals.

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the URaCE office for providing funding for this project through the SEARCH award. I would also like to thank my professors Dr. Shelton and Dr. Zelin for providing me direction, along with my research partner John Whittemore for helping me through this endeavor.

IRB Number

19-139

Degree

B. S.; An honors thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Bachelor of Science.

Date

5-2020

Subject

Cognitive psychology

Keyword

academic goal achievement; episodic future thinking; prospective memory; reminder usage

Discipline

Cognitive Psychology

Document Type

Theses

Extent

34 leaves

DCMI Type

Text

Language

English

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Date Available

5-31-2020

Available for download on Sunday, May 31, 2020

Share

COinS