Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a set of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interactions and interpersonal communication, repetitive behaviors, and narrow focus or interests. The severity of ASD is variable, but the symptoms span the entire lifespan of the individuals with ASD and few effective treatments for these symptoms have been identified. Each year in the United States, there are approximately 50,000 people with ASD who turn 18 years old in the United States (Shattuck et al., 2012). Where most 18 year olds are likely to go out and get a job, the employment prospect of individuals with ASD is not very bright. High school graduates with autism are underemployed when compared to their peers and less employed than high school graduates with other developmental or intellectual disorders (Roux, Shattuck, Rast, & Anderson, 2017). Despite this, some reports suggest that gainful employment can benefit individuals with ASD by providing them with desirable social interactions (Hendricks, 2010), and it is the focus of many service providers for individuals with ASD (Migliore et al., 2014). Like most adults, individuals with ASD benefit from the social status that comes with having a job and the degree of financial independence that employment affords them (Gerhardt & Lainer, 2011). Research has also found that employment is associated with an increase in personal dignity, improved self-esteem, increased adaptive abilities, better mental health, and improved cognitive performance for individuals with ASD (Hurlbutt & Chalmers 2004; Mawhood & Howlin 1999; Stephens et al. 2005). The principle means for addressing the underemployment and unemployment for individuals with ASD is to assist them with gaining the skills and training needed to apply for and get a job. Yet even with these efforts, the employment prospects of individuals with ASD has not significantly improved (Bennett & Dukes 2013; Taylor & Seltzer 2011). The present study will investigate the role that organizational communications about hiring and employment policies regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act may have on the potential recruitment of those with ASD as well as the degree to which potential applicants who do not have ASD view these inclusive statements as favorable.

Date

October 2018

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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The role of ADA inclusive policies in the recruiting of applicants with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a set of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interactions and interpersonal communication, repetitive behaviors, and narrow focus or interests. The severity of ASD is variable, but the symptoms span the entire lifespan of the individuals with ASD and few effective treatments for these symptoms have been identified. Each year in the United States, there are approximately 50,000 people with ASD who turn 18 years old in the United States (Shattuck et al., 2012). Where most 18 year olds are likely to go out and get a job, the employment prospect of individuals with ASD is not very bright. High school graduates with autism are underemployed when compared to their peers and less employed than high school graduates with other developmental or intellectual disorders (Roux, Shattuck, Rast, & Anderson, 2017). Despite this, some reports suggest that gainful employment can benefit individuals with ASD by providing them with desirable social interactions (Hendricks, 2010), and it is the focus of many service providers for individuals with ASD (Migliore et al., 2014). Like most adults, individuals with ASD benefit from the social status that comes with having a job and the degree of financial independence that employment affords them (Gerhardt & Lainer, 2011). Research has also found that employment is associated with an increase in personal dignity, improved self-esteem, increased adaptive abilities, better mental health, and improved cognitive performance for individuals with ASD (Hurlbutt & Chalmers 2004; Mawhood & Howlin 1999; Stephens et al. 2005). The principle means for addressing the underemployment and unemployment for individuals with ASD is to assist them with gaining the skills and training needed to apply for and get a job. Yet even with these efforts, the employment prospects of individuals with ASD has not significantly improved (Bennett & Dukes 2013; Taylor & Seltzer 2011). The present study will investigate the role that organizational communications about hiring and employment policies regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act may have on the potential recruitment of those with ASD as well as the degree to which potential applicants who do not have ASD view these inclusive statements as favorable.