Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

A recent study out of Georgetown University found that 40 percent of undergraduates and 76 percent of graduate students work full-time. Although these percentages are relatively high, working students have traditionally been understudied (Park & Sprung, 2017). The dual demand of scholarly activities and job requirements can create inter-role conflict, which occurs when the demands of one area interfere with demands of another (Oviatt et al., 2017). Ample literature exists concerning role conflict, but work-school conflict has only recently garnered more attention. Work-school conflict (WSC) is defined as conflict that occurs when work requires time away from school or when work creates strain that can affect school performance (Markel & Frone, 1998). High WSC has been associated with higher levels of substance use, poor academic performance, depressive symptoms, and lower physical health (Butler, 2007; Oviatt et al., 2017). Poor job satisfaction and high levels of burnout are also correlated with WSC (Laughman, et al., 2016). The benefits of studying WSC are abundant. Laughman et al. (2016) found burnout associated with WSC was positively correlated with turnover intentions. A better understanding of WSC could allow managers to monitor workloads for students who may be experiencing WSC related burnout. Similarly, students may benefit from a better understanding of how work and school environments relate; this may help with aspects of work-school facilitation (WSF). WSF occurs when activities and experiences at work enhance students’ ability to meet their school requirements, and a positive relationship has been reported between WSF and school performance (Butler, 2007). Job-school congruence (JSC) is a related concept that occurs when job requirements and collegiate learning are complimentary (Butler, 2007). JSC occurs when knowledge gained in school is directly applied to the work setting. Job-school similarity concerns the extent to which a student’s academic interests match the job. For example, a student may find a higher level of facilitation if the job was closely related to his/her preferred major. The purpose of this study is to measure the effects of job-school similarity on WSC, WSF, academic performance, academic satisfaction, and job satisfaction. Hypothesis 1: More job-school similarity is related to decreased WSC. Hypothesis 2: More job-school similarity is related to increased WSF. Hypothesis 3: More job-school similarity is related to better academic performance. Hypothesis 4: More job-school similarity is related to higher academic satisfaction. Hypothesis 5: More job-school similarity is related to higher job satisfaction.

Date

October 2018

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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The Effect of Job-School Similarity on Work-School Conflict and Work-School Facilitation

A recent study out of Georgetown University found that 40 percent of undergraduates and 76 percent of graduate students work full-time. Although these percentages are relatively high, working students have traditionally been understudied (Park & Sprung, 2017). The dual demand of scholarly activities and job requirements can create inter-role conflict, which occurs when the demands of one area interfere with demands of another (Oviatt et al., 2017). Ample literature exists concerning role conflict, but work-school conflict has only recently garnered more attention. Work-school conflict (WSC) is defined as conflict that occurs when work requires time away from school or when work creates strain that can affect school performance (Markel & Frone, 1998). High WSC has been associated with higher levels of substance use, poor academic performance, depressive symptoms, and lower physical health (Butler, 2007; Oviatt et al., 2017). Poor job satisfaction and high levels of burnout are also correlated with WSC (Laughman, et al., 2016). The benefits of studying WSC are abundant. Laughman et al. (2016) found burnout associated with WSC was positively correlated with turnover intentions. A better understanding of WSC could allow managers to monitor workloads for students who may be experiencing WSC related burnout. Similarly, students may benefit from a better understanding of how work and school environments relate; this may help with aspects of work-school facilitation (WSF). WSF occurs when activities and experiences at work enhance students’ ability to meet their school requirements, and a positive relationship has been reported between WSF and school performance (Butler, 2007). Job-school congruence (JSC) is a related concept that occurs when job requirements and collegiate learning are complimentary (Butler, 2007). JSC occurs when knowledge gained in school is directly applied to the work setting. Job-school similarity concerns the extent to which a student’s academic interests match the job. For example, a student may find a higher level of facilitation if the job was closely related to his/her preferred major. The purpose of this study is to measure the effects of job-school similarity on WSC, WSF, academic performance, academic satisfaction, and job satisfaction. Hypothesis 1: More job-school similarity is related to decreased WSC. Hypothesis 2: More job-school similarity is related to increased WSF. Hypothesis 3: More job-school similarity is related to better academic performance. Hypothesis 4: More job-school similarity is related to higher academic satisfaction. Hypothesis 5: More job-school similarity is related to higher job satisfaction.