Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to identify perceptions of sexual harassment in the workplace and non-workplace settings. Following the “Me Too” movement, the issue of what constitutes sexual harassment in workplace environments underwent intense speculation. Confusion about the behaviors that equate to sexual harassment not only delays making progress toward eliminating it, but risks the well-being of citizens, employees, and their organizations. Individuals who experience sexual harassment are thrust into states of psychological distress and are known to experience fear, negative moods, and a lowered satisfaction with life in general. Additionally, exhibiting behaviors of sexual harassment in the workplace has a debilitating effect on work groups and individual employees by creating hostile work environments. As a result, employees experience decreased job satisfaction and managers may notice the increased salience of turnover cues. Examining contrasting perceptions of sexual harassment in work and non-work settings articulates the need for better informed public and organizational policy. Seeking to phase out phrases such as “I didn’t know that was sexual harassment,” this study explores the existing gap between what is perceived to be sexual harassment by the individual and what is sexual harassment. Further, it examines the discrepancies between perceptions of sexual harassment in work settings versus non-work settings and seeks to inform organizations and the public about the perceptions surrounding sexual harassment. Our research questions were addressed with a survey taken by students from a southeastern college in the United States.

Date

October 2018

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS
 
Oct 27th, 11:00 AM Oct 27th, 12:00 PM

After #MeToo: Perceptions of Sexual Harassment In and Out of the Workplace

The purpose of this study is to identify perceptions of sexual harassment in the workplace and non-workplace settings. Following the “Me Too” movement, the issue of what constitutes sexual harassment in workplace environments underwent intense speculation. Confusion about the behaviors that equate to sexual harassment not only delays making progress toward eliminating it, but risks the well-being of citizens, employees, and their organizations. Individuals who experience sexual harassment are thrust into states of psychological distress and are known to experience fear, negative moods, and a lowered satisfaction with life in general. Additionally, exhibiting behaviors of sexual harassment in the workplace has a debilitating effect on work groups and individual employees by creating hostile work environments. As a result, employees experience decreased job satisfaction and managers may notice the increased salience of turnover cues. Examining contrasting perceptions of sexual harassment in work and non-work settings articulates the need for better informed public and organizational policy. Seeking to phase out phrases such as “I didn’t know that was sexual harassment,” this study explores the existing gap between what is perceived to be sexual harassment by the individual and what is sexual harassment. Further, it examines the discrepancies between perceptions of sexual harassment in work settings versus non-work settings and seeks to inform organizations and the public about the perceptions surrounding sexual harassment. Our research questions were addressed with a survey taken by students from a southeastern college in the United States.