Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

With ever-growing tension between police and the community, both police organizations and communities are recognizing the need and working toward increased representation in police organizations (Brunson, 2007; Szeto, 2014). Despite the effort of many police organizations over the years, the problem of underrepresentation has not improved (Jordan, Fridell, Fagiani, & Kubu, 2009). It has become clear that there is something that has yet to be identified and/or studied preventing underrepresented populations from being interested in or recruited into police organizations. The U.S. Department of Justice and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s 2016 report on Advancing Diversity in Law Enforcement identified three factors that may impact the recruitment of those in underrepresented communities into police organizations. These factors include lack of trust in police, the reputation or operational practices of police organizations, and lack of awareness of career opportunities in police organizations. While these factors were identified in the report, there was a lack of research supporting the factors. In an effort to gain a better understanding of what is preventing underrepresented groups from joining law enforcement, participants’ perceptions of trust, culture/policies/practices, and career opportunities in police organizations will be measured. Additionally, motivation to become a police officer and interest in a career as a police officer will be measured to increase the understanding of what does or does not contribute to underrepresented communities being interested in a career as a police officer. Regression analysis will be performed to predict interest in becoming a police officer by using the variables of trust, culture, policies/practices, and career opportunity.

Date

October 2018

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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Examining the Reasons for and Barriers to Becoming a Police Officer

With ever-growing tension between police and the community, both police organizations and communities are recognizing the need and working toward increased representation in police organizations (Brunson, 2007; Szeto, 2014). Despite the effort of many police organizations over the years, the problem of underrepresentation has not improved (Jordan, Fridell, Fagiani, & Kubu, 2009). It has become clear that there is something that has yet to be identified and/or studied preventing underrepresented populations from being interested in or recruited into police organizations. The U.S. Department of Justice and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s 2016 report on Advancing Diversity in Law Enforcement identified three factors that may impact the recruitment of those in underrepresented communities into police organizations. These factors include lack of trust in police, the reputation or operational practices of police organizations, and lack of awareness of career opportunities in police organizations. While these factors were identified in the report, there was a lack of research supporting the factors. In an effort to gain a better understanding of what is preventing underrepresented groups from joining law enforcement, participants’ perceptions of trust, culture/policies/practices, and career opportunities in police organizations will be measured. Additionally, motivation to become a police officer and interest in a career as a police officer will be measured to increase the understanding of what does or does not contribute to underrepresented communities being interested in a career as a police officer. Regression analysis will be performed to predict interest in becoming a police officer by using the variables of trust, culture, policies/practices, and career opportunity.