Committee Chair

Miller, Ted L.

Committee Member

Adsit, Karen I.; Crawford, Elizabeth K.; Bernard, Warren J.

Department

Dept. of Education

College

College of Health, Education, and Professional Studies

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Participating in career technical education has been associated with increased completion of secondary and postsecondary educational programs among other positive effects for students. Selected academic and vocational outcomes were examined relating to the curricular concentration students engaged in during high school and various demographic characteristics. There was no significant effect for curricular concentration on job satisfaction as reported by survey respondents eight years after completing high school. Neither was there any significant effect for gender, ethnic identity, or socioeconomic status on job satisfaction, or for the prediction of future educational attainment. Non-career technical education concentrators scored significantly higher than career technical education concentrators on their judgment of how much they liked high school. Implications for educator practice, training, and funding were discussed.

Degree

Ed. D.; A dissertation submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Education.

Date

5-2018

Subject

Technical education; Vocational education; Career education

Keyword

Career technical education; Job satisfaction; Engagement

Document Type

Doctoral dissertations

Extent

xiv, 116 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS