Committee Chair

Garland, Tammy S.

Committee Member

Policastro, Christina; Bumphus, Vic W.

Department

Dept. of Criminal Justice and Legal Assistant Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Numerous studies have examined university student perceptions of a plethora of criminal justice related topics. However, there has been no published research on university student perceptions of, or level of support for, the relatively new body-worn camera technology. Using data collected from sample of 244 students enrolled at a midsized southeastern university, this study examined the perceptions of body-worn cameras held by university students. Demographic and educational characteristics, as well as individual level experiences, were measured for to determine their relationship with student perceptions. Findings indicated that respondents held positive attitudes of body-worn cameras. Perceived inequality in the use of force and major emerged as significant predictors of the level of support for body-worn cameras.

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank my thesis committee, Dr. Vic Bumphus and Dr. Christina Policastro, with special thanks to my chair, Dr. Tammy Garland. I would also like to thank my parents and Gran for their support and guidance throughout the thesis process.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2018

Subject

Electronic evidence; Wearable video devices in police work; Police-community relations -- Public opinion

Keyword

Body-worn cameras; University students; Inequality; Perception; Race; Major

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

x, 49 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS