Committee Chair

Policastro, Christiana M.

Committee Member

Garland, Tammy S.; Crittenden, Courtney A.

Department

Dept. of Criminal Justice and Legal Assistant Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The extant literature indicates that women comprise the majority of sexual assault victims. Emerging research suggests that although men are less likely than women to be sexually victimized, a sizeable minority of men experience sexual assault in their lifetimes and a growing body of literature has begun to consider societal attitudes towards male rape victims. The current study adds to the literature by exploring undergraduate students’ assignment of indirect blame and justification in sexual assault incidents involving male victims. More specifically, data based on vignettes where situational characteristics were manipulated are used to determine how various incident, offender, and victim-level characteristics influence student perceptions. It was found that this sample of students were more likely to agree with indirect blame measures rather than direct. Age, sex, past victimization, and two of the three subscales from Struckman-Johnson and Struckman-Johnson’s (1992) male rape myth scale were significant within the logistic regression models.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2019

Subject

Male rape; Male rape victims; Male sexual abuse victims

Keyword

Male rape; Rape myths; Indirect blame; Victim blame; Sexual assault; Rape

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

ix, 62 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

Share

COinS