Committee Chair

David Rausch

Committee Member

Hinsdale Bernard; Elizabeth K. Crawford; Ted L. Miller

Department

School of Professional Studies

College

College of Health, Education, and Professional Studies

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between the level of communication technology use in the workplace by University of Tennessee Extension program assistants and their interpersonal communication skills. There were seven quantitative research questions and one qualitative question. The main research question explored whether a significant difference existed in employees’ reported levels of communication skills in the workplace, as measured by the sociocommunicative orientation (SCO) scale, based on employees’ reported levels of communication technology use. Other questions explored whether there was a significant interaction between employees’ reported levels of communication technology use and their job positions on their levels of communication skills, a significant interaction between employees’ reported level of communication technology use and areas of foci on their levels of communication skills, a significant difference in employees’ assertiveness or responsiveness scores based on reported levels of communication technology use, and a significant difference in employees’ SCO scores based on their job position or areas of foci. Analysis of variance and chi-square tests were administered to determine relationships, if any. The qualitative question asked Extension administrators about their perceptions of differences or similarities in program assistants’ levels of communication skills relative to their associated job positions and areas of foci. Direct analysis was conducted on the telephone interview question to determine trends or common themes. Although analyses of data for the seven quantitative questions revealed no significant differences in level of communication skills based on level of communication technology use, common themes emerged relative to interpersonal communication skills for program assistants. Common themes that emerged specifically from analysis of the telephone interview transcripts give cause for recommendations for further study as relates to communication skills and communication skills development for program assistants.

Acknowledgments

My deepest appreciation is extended to my dissertation committee and especially to my chair, Dr. David Rausch, for knowledge, guidance, support, and encouragement. There were times that I may not have continued this journey were it not for your continuous urgings of onward and upward. Thanks to University of Tennessee (UT) Extension, in particular the program assistants, for their time and assistance, without which this study would not have been possible. My gratitude to the Martin cohort, the UT Knoxville doctoral group, and my UT family for their care and belief in me. You are lifelong friends. And most of all, I acknowledge almighty God who continues to gift and equip me with everything I need to succeed.

Degree

Ed. D.; A dissertation submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Education.

Date

12-2019

Subject

Business communication; Interpersonal communication

Keyword

Interpersonal communication; Communication technology use; Extension program assistants

Discipline

Educational Leadership

Document Type

Doctoral dissertations

Extent

xii, 123 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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