Committee Chair

Black, Kristen Jennings

Committee Member

Zelin, Alexandra I.; Cunningham, Christopher J. L.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Although workers with chronic health conditions have received little attention in past Industrial-Organizational Psychology research, the COVID-19 pandemic has brought new concerns for the workplace safety of these employees. I applied the JD-R model to a sample of 143 workers with chronic conditions, looking at how prevalent demands and resources impacted levels of burnout and emotional well-being. Quantitative analyses supported that job demands (i.e., devaluation and job insecurity) were generally related to negative health outcomes, while job resources (i.e., support and flexibility) were related to better health outcomes. Results also indicated that the impact of demands and resources on health might vary based on condition characteristics, such as visibility. The results of this study can help organizations better understand the unique impacts of job demands and resources for those with chronic health conditions. With this information, organizations can create more appropriate interventions and accommodations for this workplace population.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2022

Subject

COVID-19 Pandemic, 2020-; Employee health promotion; Industrial hygiene

Keyword

job demands; job resources; employees; chronic health conditions

Document Type

Masters theses

DCMI Type

Text

Extent

viii, 60 leaves

Language

English

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/

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