Files

Download

Download Full Text (139.1 MB)

Abstract

Results of archaeological and documentary research relating to the Bluff Furnace Site (1854-1860), a hot-blast iron furnace in Chattanooga, Tennessee, are presented. Research objectives for the project were defined as (1) establishing the coherent nature of the archaeological remains, (2) defining distinct activity areas at the site, (3) identifying the industrial processes that occurred there and determining their relative efficiencies, (4) establishing the local and regional significance of the operation in an industrial and economic sense, and (5) realizing the educational potential of the site. Data applicable to meeting these objectives were generated from the synthesis of archaeological and documentary lines of evidence. Major structural components of the early charcoal-fueled and later coke-fueled periods of the site were exposed during the excavation, including the base of a coke-fired cupola containing an in situ iron salamander. Analysis of by-products and pig iron samples indicate the operation was capable of producing a high quality finished product, though in a somewhat inefficient manner. In comparison to other blast furnaces in the United States at mid-nineteenth century, Bluff Furnace is seen as an innovative industrial enterprise in a regional perspective.

Department

Dept. of Social, Cultural, and Justice Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Date

4-1982

Subject

Bluff Furnace--Chattanooga History; Tennessee--Antiquities

Location

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Document Type

reports

Extent

viii, 156 leaves

Language

English

Call Number

TS330.B58 C68 1982

Rights

Under copyright.

Bluff Furnace : archaeology of a nineteenth century blast furnace

Share

COinS