Committee Chair

Biderman, Michael D.

Committee Member

Cunningham, Christopher J. L.; Weathington, Bart L.

Department

Dept. of Psychology

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which common method variance (CMV) impacted many of the relationships between personality traits and the construct of burnout among registered nurses. It was hypothesized that once CMV was calculated and controlled for, relationships between personality traits and burnout would be weakened. Data were collected from working registered nurses (N = 274) and from BSN student nurses (N = 8). Scales measuring the IPIP Big Five, burnout, hardiness, core self-evaluation, optimism, and stress in general were combined to create a survey questionnaire. Results indicated burnout among nurses was significantly related with one’s level of hardiness, core self-evaluation, stability, and conscientiousness. When CMV was calculated and controlled for, those relationships were significantly weakened. Researchers and practitioners need to be aware of the impact of CMV and how to appropriately remove its contamination when trying to establish relationships between self-report variables.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2013

Subject

Burn out (Psychology); Work -- Psychological aspects; Nurses -- Job stress

Discipline

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

x, 44 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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