Department

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Dept. of Psychology

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

Many organizations utilize a team-focused work structure in the workplace. Researchers have studied how working as a team can improve organizational outcomes such as productivity and employee satisfaction (Katzenbach & Smith, 1993). However, not all teams make positive outcomes (Hackman, 1998). Previous research has shown that effective teamwork can facilitate group and organizational effectiveness (Salas, Stagl, Burke, & Goodwin, 2007). Various models of teamwork process have been developed (Marks, Mathieu, & Zaccaro, 2001; Rousseau, Aube, & Savoie, 2006; Salas, Sims, & Burke, 2005). A meta-analysis found a consistent relationship between the ten dimensions of teamwork identified by Marks et al. (2001) and team performance (LePine, Piccolo, Jackson, Mathieu, & Saul, 2008). Previous research has shown that team members with high cognitive ability, certain personality characteristics, and job-related knowledge and skills may contribute to better performance (Devine & Philips, 2001; Mathieu & Schulze, 2006; Morgeson, Reider, & Campion, 2005; Neuman & Wright, 1999). Among those characteristics, having aggregate member knowledge of teamwork showed a positive relationship with team performance (McClough & Rogelberg, 2003), but the relationship between individual teamwork knowledge and individual teamwork behaviors has not been widely examined. In this study, the relationship between teamwork knowledge and teamwork behavior will be examined. Building on the main relationship, this study will also investigate the impact of persons in core roles within a team. Certain characteristics of core team members, whose position would not be easily replaced and could not be completed by any other teammates, are known to be more important for overall team performance (Humphrey, Morgeson, & Mannor, 2009). The following hypotheses will be examined: Hypothesis 1: At the individual level, teamwork knowledge is positively related to teamwork behavior at the individual level. Hypothesis 2: Teamwork knowledge (Teamwork SJT score) of the core member is positively related to teamwork behavior of the core role-holder. Hypothesis 3: At the team level, there will be a positive correlation between teamwork knowledge and teamwork. Hypothesis 4: There is a positive relationship between the core member’s teamwork knowledge and team-level teamwork. The study will utilize teams participating in high-fidelity simulations of airline operations. Analysis plans will be discussed.

Date

October 2018

Subject

Industrial and organizational psychology

Document Type

posters

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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The Relationship between Teamwork Knowledge and Teamwork Behavior

Many organizations utilize a team-focused work structure in the workplace. Researchers have studied how working as a team can improve organizational outcomes such as productivity and employee satisfaction (Katzenbach & Smith, 1993). However, not all teams make positive outcomes (Hackman, 1998). Previous research has shown that effective teamwork can facilitate group and organizational effectiveness (Salas, Stagl, Burke, & Goodwin, 2007). Various models of teamwork process have been developed (Marks, Mathieu, & Zaccaro, 2001; Rousseau, Aube, & Savoie, 2006; Salas, Sims, & Burke, 2005). A meta-analysis found a consistent relationship between the ten dimensions of teamwork identified by Marks et al. (2001) and team performance (LePine, Piccolo, Jackson, Mathieu, & Saul, 2008). Previous research has shown that team members with high cognitive ability, certain personality characteristics, and job-related knowledge and skills may contribute to better performance (Devine & Philips, 2001; Mathieu & Schulze, 2006; Morgeson, Reider, & Campion, 2005; Neuman & Wright, 1999). Among those characteristics, having aggregate member knowledge of teamwork showed a positive relationship with team performance (McClough & Rogelberg, 2003), but the relationship between individual teamwork knowledge and individual teamwork behaviors has not been widely examined. In this study, the relationship between teamwork knowledge and teamwork behavior will be examined. Building on the main relationship, this study will also investigate the impact of persons in core roles within a team. Certain characteristics of core team members, whose position would not be easily replaced and could not be completed by any other teammates, are known to be more important for overall team performance (Humphrey, Morgeson, & Mannor, 2009). The following hypotheses will be examined: Hypothesis 1: At the individual level, teamwork knowledge is positively related to teamwork behavior at the individual level. Hypothesis 2: Teamwork knowledge (Teamwork SJT score) of the core member is positively related to teamwork behavior of the core role-holder. Hypothesis 3: At the team level, there will be a positive correlation between teamwork knowledge and teamwork. Hypothesis 4: There is a positive relationship between the core member’s teamwork knowledge and team-level teamwork. The study will utilize teams participating in high-fidelity simulations of airline operations. Analysis plans will be discussed.