Committee Chair

Bumphus, Vic

Committee Member

Kule, Ahmet; Iles, Gale D.

Department

Dept. of Criminal Justice and Legal Assistant Studies

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Publisher

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Place of Publication

Chattanooga (Tenn.)

Abstract

To identify individuals at greater risk for violent victimization, police agencies have begun to use lethality assessments. This strategy involves the use of screening questions asked of victims that assess dangerousness. Grounded in the criminological literature on domestic violence (DV), the Maryland Lethality Assessment Protocol (LAP) has been adopted in numerous jurisdictions. More specifically, this risk assessment targets episodes of intimate partner violence (IPV). These situations tend to precipitate greater levels of lethality. Using risk assessment reports from a county located in the southern United States, this research examines the correlates of intimate violence, the predictive ability of the screening instrument, and distribution of intimate partner violence across areas with different degrees of economic stability. Findings suggest that offender sex, employment status, a recent separation, and scoring high on the assessment screening items helps to predict prior victimization. The subculture of violence perspective is used as a theoretical context.

Degree

M. S.; A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science.

Date

5-2019

Subject

Intimate partner violence; Family violence; Victims of violent crimes

Document Type

Masters theses

Extent

x, 53 leaves

Language

English

Rights

Under copyright.

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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